In life as in journalism - open-ended questions yield the most interesting answers

Curiosity is an essential and endearing asset, and the number of questions and the type of questions you ask of others can define who you are.

People are flattered by questions. When I embarked on my first - and hugely unsuccessful - round of dating as a teenager, a wise male friend advised me to stop trying to impress by endlessly talking about myself. "Ask them questions" he said. "Then ask a a follow-up, then another." 

But what type of questions to ask?


On the way home from school recently, I asked my son "How was your day?". The answer was perfunctory and predictable: "Good" - which hardly makes a great quote or headline. So I had to think harder.  My next was an improvement: "what was the best thing that happened today?" That solicited a long response about the soccer match at recess, which enabled me to ask follow-ups.

Questions which invite a short response, usually informational questions, are mostly easy to answer, but the answer is limited and doesn't encourage conversation. These are known as "closed questions".

"Leading questions" can be used to solicit a particular response, often the one the inquisitor desires. "Rhetorical questions" urge the interviewee to agree with the point the questioner is making (usually in speech-writing or in advocacy). The website explains these definitions in more detail.


Open-ended questions are almost always the best strategy for journalists. They are more likely to yield a longer and more personal answer, providing you a with a human perspective for your story.

"How?" or "What happened?""how did you do that....?"

or "what did you think of....?" or simply

"what happened when you.......?

Even in an adversarial interview (for instance, with a politician or a business leader trying to avoid bad publicity) open-ended questions are better.

Don't ask: "Are you going to resign?"

Do ask:- "Many people have called for your resignation. What's your reaction?"

You are inviting an answer which tells a story, which makes for a better headline, quote, sound-bite, or narrative for your feature. There is more chance this type of question will solicit honesty, or intent, background anecdotes, interesting new angles, and emotion from the interviewee.  Try it for your next reporting assignment. Then try it socially with your friends - it works there too. The goal is to get people talking, and to open up to you.

The Irish author James Stephens wrote: "We get wise asking questions, and even if these questions are not answered, we get wise, for a well-;packed question carries its answer on its back as a snail carries its shell."